News itemA great example of the free market failing miserably: http://www.viddler.com/explore/etika/videos/7/
      – Thelevellers, 2011-01-09 at 00:21:38   (6 comments)

On 2011-01-09 at 00:23:09, Thelevellers wrote...
You can completely ignore most of the 'conspiracy' side of this, and it's still ridiculous - there was clearly AT LEAST a market for selling the EV-1s already made to their lease-holders. Crushing them made zero sense in any way shape or form. (Except to keep oil companies happy :P )
On 2011-01-09 at 17:04:41, DigitalBoss wrote...
This movie does not document a failure of a free market, what it documents is a failed attempt of a government to control a market. The electric vehicle, or vehicles using any other alternative technologies will succeed when they are ready to succeed, determined by consumers in the marketplace, not by politicians, Republicans or Democrats, in the government.
On 2011-01-09 at 22:02:36, Thelevellers wrote...
Did you even watch it? What reason was there to take back the cars? People were willing to buy them - why not sell them and at least make some money out of it? I agree the law attempt was a bit failed, but it did show there was a desire for the product. I meant that the fact they took the cars off the leasers and crushed them was a major failing. There is no good reason to do that, at all! Fair enough if you REALLY believe the companies that there wasn't enough demand to warrant upping the production rates, then fine, don;t make any new ones. But why the hell do you crush hundreds (thousands? I can;t remember) of perfectly good cars, that there is a market to sell?
On 2011-01-10 at 17:22:08, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Yes. I watched the video. GM said that they took back the cars because their marketing surveys had indicated that the cars were not ready for the market. The Chevy Volt comes out later this year, the free market and the consumer should decide such things, not the government. GM's legal department was probably behind the heavy-handed confiscation policy, lawsuits and all. They knew the batteries were not going to last long and they were very expensive. The movie was talking about a few hundred cars, GM has to be concerned with if thousands, or even millions would be sold. GM knows a whole lot more about making cars than a few moonbats in California or a bunch of politicians in Washington.
On 2011-01-10 at 17:30:10, DigitalBoss wrote...
The cars were GM's to take as they wished, they were leased. As to their reason, or motive, I don't care, it was their business, not yours or mine.
On 2011-01-12 at 17:32:52, DigitalBoss wrote...
As it turns, government regulation itself is the reason for taking these cars off the market: "In addition, the cost of maintaining a parts supply and service infrastructure for the 15-year minimum required by the state of California meant that existing leases would not be renewed, and all the cars would have to be returned to GM's possession." Wikipedia