QuestionWhat is your favorite crowning point of awesome in fiction?
      – BorgClown, 2010-01-27 at 06:45:19   (27 comments)

On 2010-01-27 at 06:51:12, BorgClown wrote...
I was driving home when I remembered my favorite awesome moment about some work of fiction. Stupid me, as I tried to recall more, I forgot the best =( Well, at least I have another one: In "the usual suspects", the ending was great, less than a minute automatically made the whole movie better.
On 2010-01-27 at 13:25:56, DigitalBoss wrote...
"As for collisions, well, Charlie was a mega-sweet machine, but he ran on eight hundred and seventy-five million lines of code. Good code, solid well-tested code, spewed through distributed parallel processors far swifter and more accurate than the nervous system of any human driver. But code was still code, and code could crash. If the code crashed when Charlie was number-crunching high speed all-terrain pursuit, then crashing Charlie would be the same as crashing any pre-cybernetic car: fast hard stupid metal versus soft wet human flesh." --Heavy Weather, Bruce Sterling 1994. Charlie is a military pursuit vehicle, modified by storm chasers, and used to "hack" heavy weather in the 2030's.
On 2010-01-27 at 23:14:21, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: 'Fiction' covers a lot - you've chosen a film, but I'd imagined you were referring to books at first. My favourite film is still Minority Report, but it's still going to take some time to think of a single moment (from somewhere else) that's exceptional.
On 2010-01-28 at 03:25:36, BorgClown wrote...
@DigitalBoss: Damn, gotta read that book.
On 2010-01-28 at 03:27:30, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Yes, I meant all types of fiction: Films, anime, books, videogames, etc. It's a pity we have so few users these times, I'm sure there would be great input otherwise.
On 2010-01-28 at 11:04:15, DigitalBoss wrote...
Every time I read a good book, if I come across an exceptional passage, or section, I take note. I have more, I just need to find that notebook.
On 2010-01-29 at 05:12:32, BorgClown wrote...
Do you reread that notebook often? Most of the time I take notes I rarely use, on average only one tenth of my notes end up being frequently reread. It's fun writing them though, and the feeling of having a cache of distilled knowledge is cool also.
On 2010-01-29 at 13:56:30, DigitalBoss wrote...
I refer to it from time to time. Mainly when I am looking to read something and I don't have anything new, and need to read something I have already read. I read Atlas Shrugged a few years ago, there were some interesting sections of John Galt's speech near the end of the book. I will look for it this weekend.
On 2010-01-30 at 04:07:48, BorgClown wrote...
That reminded me of a joke: Anna lend a romantic novel to Louise, and she returned it the next day. Anna asked Louise if she didn't like it, but Louise said she liked it a lot. Anna said "wow, you're a fast reader", and Louise answered "Not at all, I just read the folded pages". ... Ah, you had to be there =)
On 2010-02-04 at 09:20:43, Thelevellers wrote...
Wow, why haven't I thought of making a notebook of favourite bits of books? I have found so many over the years, and tend to text them to friends who will appreciate them, but no longer have those texts as a record... From memory, my most text-quoted books were The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien, and White Noise by Don Dellilo. I would actually say that as an entire work Underworld is the better Dellilo book, but it isn't as quote-able as it's all about the tying up of different bits of storyline.
On 2010-02-05 at 21:08:13, Thelevellers wrote...
I'm not sure where this is from (it could be a non-fiction quote), but I found this written on an old note book I found while cleaning up this evening: "Legal systems were once so deficient that they required evidence for the prosecution of crimes" Made me smile :)
On 2010-02-06 at 15:43:07, Lee J Haywood wrote...
There's a couple of series of books I've read where the whole backstory and challenges faced turn out to be predicated on craziness. For example, Raymond E Feist's Riftwar Saga features a character whose goal turns out to be completely unrelated to what all the other characters are doing - he sees a bigger picture than them, and destroys a vital truce in order to save them all. It's a crowning point because you've spent a long time reading the various sub-plots and trying to work out what's going on only to have the climax thrown away by one individual.
On 2010-03-06 at 18:49:25, DigitalBoss wrote...
"A rational process is a moral process. You who prattle that morality is social and that man would need no morality on a desert island, it is on a desert island that he would need it most. Let him try to claim, when there are no victims to pay for it, that a rock is a house, that sand is clothing, that food will drop into his mouth without cause or effort, that he will collect a harvest tomorrow by devouring his stock seed today, and reality will wipe him out, as he deserves; reality will show him that life is a value to be bought and that thinking is the only coin noble enough to buy it." -- John Galt's speech, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, 1957.
On 2010-03-06 at 23:59:35, Thelevellers wrote...
What?! Do I misunderstand the definition of morality?! What the hell has morality got to do with the ability to find food and shelter? I see the point that you need to sort yourself out if you're stuck on a desert island, but sorting your self out isn't anything to do with morals, it's all to do with survival. I really don't see any connection between the first/second sentence and the rest of that quote.
On 2010-03-07 at 20:03:47, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: "Man's life is the standard of morality, but your own life is its purpose. If existence on earth is your goal, you must choose your actions and values by the standard of that which is proper for man; for the purpose of preserving, fulfilling and enjoying the irreplaceable value which is your life." "Since life requires a specific course of action, any other course will destroy it. A being who does not hold his own life as the motive and goal of his actions, is acting on the motive and standard of death. Such a being is a metaphysical monstrosity, struggling to oppose, negate and contradict the fact of his own existence running blindly amuck on a trail of destruction, capable of nothing but pain." ‒ John Galt's speech, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, 1957.
On 2010-03-07 at 20:12:40, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Morality has everything to do with finding food and shelter. If you do not, your life will end. Your main goal in life is to perpetuate your own life. Selfishness is the first noble moral. Without it you are but a vegetable waiting to be eaten. If there is a guide to all rational beings, selfishness must be the most important virtue.
On 2010-03-07 at 21:48:36, Thelevellers wrote...
It is arguably a virtue to fight for your own survival, but I wouldn't say it is MORAL. "Morality: conformity to the rules of right conduct; moral or virtuous conduct." From http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/morality My point isn't that you shouldn't try to survive, but that the will and urge to survive are not necessarily moral objectives. Morality is a different thing to what you are saying. Because my life will end if I do not eat doesn't make it immoral to starve myself to death. in fact, if I was on hunger strike for a cause, then it could be argued that it was a moral action - thus pointing to the flaw in your logic of stating that mere survival is a moral choice. But then, as you don;t believe in society, then I guess you would never see the point in protesting with your life for others good, would you?
On 2010-03-08 at 20:32:11, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Morality: a guide to all rational beings.
On 2010-03-09 at 18:17:53, Thelevellers wrote...
Where does that definition come from? If it's from the book you're quoting it doesn't count as a recognised definition. That said, 'a guide to all rational beings' doesn't mean survival at all, it means a guide, to what? Living a good life? Again, there's no reason that surviving is a good life.
On 2010-03-10 at 00:53:32, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Definition of morality: http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/morality-definition/
On 2010-03-10 at 09:05:39, Thelevellers wrote...
@DigitalBoss: Thank-you, an interesting read, gives me a better idea of what people mean when they say 'morality'. I still think the second part of my last comment applies, however.
On 2010-03-11 at 03:40:19, DigitalBoss wrote...
"A farmer will not invest the effort of one summer if he's unable to calculate his chances of a harvest. But you expect industrial giants, who plan in terms of decades, invest in terms of generations, and undertake ninety-nine-year contracts, to continue to function and produce, not knowing what random caprice in the skull of what random government official will descend upon them at what moment to demolish the whole of their effort." -- John Galt's speech, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, 1957. Exactly the reason why America's economic engine is on hold in this Democrat administration.
On 2010-03-11 at 03:48:24, DigitalBoss wrote...
"Drifters and physical laborers live and plan by the range of a day. The better the mind, the longer the range. A man whose vision extends to a shanty, might continue to build on quicksands, to grab a fast profit and run. A man who envisions sky-scrapers, will not. Nor will he give ten years of unswerving devotion to the task of inventing a new product, when he knows that gangs of entrenched mediocrity are juggling the laws against him, to tie him, to restrict him, and force him to fail, but should he fight them and struggle to succeed, they will seize his rewards and his invention." -- John Galt's speech, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand, 1957.
On 2010-03-11 at 04:00:30, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Surviving is much better than not surviving.
On 2010-03-11 at 09:05:42, Thelevellers wrote...
Better for you, yes. Doesn't necessarily make it moral.
On 2010-03-11 at 12:34:49, DigitalBoss wrote...
@Thelevellers: Survival is the first moral. You can't loot and pillage my wealth if I don't survive.
On 2010-03-11 at 21:57:08, Thelevellers wrote...
@DigitalBoss: What?! First off, yes I can - it might not be your wealth any more, but I most definitely get it... And secondly, I don't really see your point regarding that anyway?