QuestionHow would you answer if someone asked you "what's the most important thing you've learnt from life"?
      – Lee J Haywood, 2009-11-25 at 12:37:23   (9 comments)

On 2009-11-26 at 02:43:44, BorgClown wrote...
I'd say "Go away, Ophra, leave me alone"
On 2009-11-26 at 02:48:27, BorgClown wrote...
Honestly, I don't know how to answer. Maybe self-acceptance, it contributes a lot to your happiness.
On 2009-11-26 at 14:29:10, Lee J Haywood wrote...
My answer was, "I've learnt that in order to be happy in life you need a lot of variety in the things you do." I think there's no single answer and too many things you learn to easily choose just one. But then thinking about the question forces you to evaluate your life, so perhaps that's worth the effort by itself?
On 2009-11-27 at 01:41:07, BorgClown wrote...
Too many things to learn can make you unhappy because you can't learn all the interesting ones.
On 2009-11-27 at 10:44:08, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: That reminds me of something I've always held true... "You see," he explained, "I consider that a man's brain originally is like a little empty attic, and you have to stock it with such furniture as you choose. A fool takes in all the lumber of every sort that he comes across, so that the knowledge which might be useful to him gets crowded out, or at best is jumbled up with a lot of other things so that he has a difficulty in laying his hands upon it. Now the skilful workman is very careful indeed as to what he takes into his brain-attic. He will have nothing but the tools which may help him in doing his work, but of these he has a large assortment, and all in the most perfect order. It is a mistake to think that that little room has elastic walls and can distend to any extent. Depend upon it there comes a time when for every addition of knowledge you forget something that you knew before. It is of the highest importance, therefore, not to have useless facts elbowing out the useful ones."
On 2009-11-27 at 21:37:59, DigitalBoss wrote...
To put the toilet seat back down.
On 2009-11-28 at 03:47:19, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: And then Alzheimer messes your attic! Not fair!
On 2009-11-28 at 11:12:01, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: Actually, we know that the better use you make of your mind the greater protection you have when you do get Alzheimer's, etc. - it's called cognitive buffering, or something similar. Some individuals have the plaques associated with advanced Alzheimer's at autopsy, yet showed hardly any deterioration whilst alive - simply because their minds had the resilience to keep going due to strong use earlier in life.
On 2009-11-28 at 11:12:04, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I have now been told the site this question relates to! http://www.mylifelesson.co.uk/