Web site"The Great American Bubble Machine" http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/28816321/the_great_american_bubble_machine
      – BorgClown, 2009-07-05 at 22:08:02   (12 comments)

On 2009-07-05 at 22:10:02, BorgClown wrote...
A very, very interesting read. Rolling Stones magazine article found via Digg. It even has a prediction: The next economic bubble will be the carbon credits market, and the Obama administration will make it happen.
On 2009-07-05 at 22:33:33, Lee J Haywood wrote...
You don't need to read an article to know that most carbon reduction schemes aren't worth anything. You can tax fossil fuels at the point of extraction, to aim for massive and measurable reduction, or you can tax them to hell and pass laws to ensure the adoption of zero-carbon systems. But trading credits to achieve minor reductions is just pointless.
On 2009-07-06 at 18:08:59, DigitalBoss wrote...
People are always trying to blame someone for their stupidity. In a free market, people should be free to speculate all they want. Speculation is the basis for all of these bubbles. If you end up on the bad end of it it is only your fault. In America, you are just as free to fail as you are to succeed. If you bought a home that you knew you could not afford, but figured you could sell later at a higher price for a profit, you are a speculator. You are speculating on two things, one that when you put your house up for sale that someone will buy it, and two that they will buy it with you making a profit. Insert the word stock, oil, carbon credit, whatever you want for the word home in the preceding sentence, it will be accurate. In all the above cases, the speculators got what they deserved. They either made money, or they lost money. When a market gets tight, it is only natural for speculation to take place, the wise investor sees it for what it is and steers clear.
On 2009-07-06 at 21:12:37, DigitalBoss wrote...
Making good decisions is key.
On 2009-07-06 at 21:21:15, Baslisks wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Sweden initially started with a similar plan though there was incredibly more stringent. It worked and allowed the companies to be competitive and clean.
On 2009-07-06 at 21:22:29, Baslisks wrote...
@DigitalBoss: Good decisions are hard to make when the market is hidden under a cloud of lies and deceit. Speculation is fine but when there are people trading on the inside then you have problems with the market.
On 2009-07-07 at 01:26:17, BorgClown wrote...
Check this out, the automated stock trading software is not a leftist delusion. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aFpxmHJDlmjo&override=1 Why would you need software who "sophisticated, high-speed and high-volume trades on various stock and commodities markets" if not to steer the supposedly free market and profit before turning the wheel?
On 2009-07-07 at 01:27:17, BorgClown wrote...
And please excuse my broken English
On 2009-07-07 at 15:59:21, DigitalBoss wrote...
Is that English that you speak? :)
On 2009-07-08 at 01:20:29, BorgClown wrote...
I used to speak Spanish, but it became so awesome it started to turn into Awespanish, but nobody understood me. Now I use English. Borken Engilsh.
On 2009-07-09 at 09:10:16, Thelevellers wrote...
I think Spawesome is a better word myself... :)
On 2009-07-10 at 20:01:14, BorgClown wrote...
Oh, how perceptive. Spawesome is an intermediate phase, where people start hearing as if you talked like the smurfs, i.e., "Hey babe, I want to awesome you in the awesome!". After Awespanish, people only hear gibberish. I've heard that you need a second brain to process the meaning while the first one is entertained in the awesomeness. Why, even my computer hanged parsing the awesomeness of my writings until I mapped /dev/awesome to /dev/nul. The poor thing has been a wee bit depressed since then...