OpinionIt's impressive that personal computers have become so powerful so fast
      – BorgClown, 2009-06-14 at 04:11:31   (31 comments)

On 2009-06-14 at 04:16:21, BorgClown wrote...
Theres a news article about the ten coolest and powerful supercomputers of all time. I hope you remember when Cray was synonym with awesome god-like computing. They first Cray-1 was built in 1976, and it's impressive than 20 years later, the best desktops outperformed it by a 13 factor. I can't help wondering what will be using in twenty years. I love how IT changes so fast. http://royal.pingdom.com/2009/06/11/10-of-the-coolest-and-most-powerful-supercomputers-of-all-time/
On 2009-06-14 at 04:16:45, BorgClown wrote...
*and most powerful
On 2009-06-14 at 11:18:01, Thelevellers wrote...
Yeah, I love all the old computer hardware adds online... '10Mb! AMAZING! And only $5,000,00,0,00,00000,00,0' ;-)
On 2009-06-15 at 17:31:30, DigitalBoss wrote...
Just wait a few more years... My brother works at Intel... he says that they have a test bed chip with 80 cores on it. Wow.
On 2009-06-16 at 05:56:31, BorgClown wrote...
It makes sense if we consider that supercomputers have added more and more processors. Multicore CPUs are the consumer version of that trend. I wonder how much energy would a 80 core CPU consume.
On 2009-06-22 at 11:33:52, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Storage capacity is the most impressive - being able to store several high-quality movies on a card the size of my fingernail is something that I would have been absolutely stunned by in the 1970s or 1980s. I regularly carry TV programmes recorded on my computer on an SD card to my living room and find it impressive how much smaller and easier they are than CDs and DVDs.
On 2009-06-24 at 02:37:41, BorgClown wrote...
You're right, it never struck me that I have carried more than 10 hours of anime on my previous phone. Wow, epiphany. <tt>The future is now!
On 2009-06-24 at 02:43:42, Baslisks wrote...
@BorgClown: geeeeek! ... on my terabyte drive at home, thank you very much.
On 2009-06-24 at 03:03:50, BorgClown wrote...
Cell phone video is tiny, 10 hours only used 4Gb.
On 2009-06-25 at 20:37:02, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Of course we know that mobile telephones only work thanks to their cell towers, but when you look at their video, sound and location technologies - packed into ever-decreasing handsets - you can imagine how amazing they'd look to someone from the 1970s. And then there's your broadband speeds - getting a movie in less time than it takes to watch it, and having space for dozens of them in high, digital quality stored on your computer.
On 2009-06-25 at 21:13:59, Baslisks wrote...
You could go to the moon on a cellphone based computer if you really wanted to.
On 2009-06-27 at 03:05:34, BorgClown wrote...
Imagine the JVM garbage collection happening seconds before landing. lawl.
On 2009-06-27 at 04:07:49, BorgClown wrote...
This one is old, but I just saw it today: http://www.makemymood.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/29.jpg
On 2009-09-25 at 22:20:36, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Speaking of SD cards, I just went to un-delete a picture from my new 8GB SDHC card and discovered a picture I hadn't taken. http://www.discussionator.com/TestImage.jpg It only half-recovered, but there's an embedded thumbnail which shows the bottom half. http://www.discussionator.com/TestImage_thumb.jpg Which is weird... I guess the manufacturer (byteStor) used it as a test image and then deleted it before shipment.
On 2009-09-25 at 22:42:45, Baslisks wrote...
or asians stole your camera and returned it.
On 2009-09-25 at 22:44:33, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@Baslisks: The data says it was taken 2002-08-03 which is long before my camera was even invented.
On 2009-09-25 at 22:47:56, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Actually, the camera it was taken on (Fujifilm MX-1700) isn't mine anyway. Plus I don't remember meeting any of those Asians.
On 2009-09-26 at 01:12:24, BorgClown wrote...
Or... You were a secret agent spying Asians, and you got caught. They erased your memory. Yes, totally plausible.
On 2009-09-26 at 01:13:35, BorgClown wrote...
Wat, the image only goes halfway, was a portion erased?
On 2009-09-26 at 01:14:33, BorgClown wrote...
Look at the guy in the black T-shirt, he's totally mocking you because he was the one who tortured you and erased your memory...
On 2009-09-26 at 10:11:53, Lee J Haywood wrote...
As I said, I was un-deleting images and had already been using the card for a week so that existing image had been mostly lost - I was lucky to find it at all. Now you mention it, I have been having memory problems recently. Maybe I'm being abducted repeatedly. That'd explain it.
On 2009-09-26 at 22:30:12, BorgClown wrote...
We all have memory problems, don't worry. That is, unless you're starting to remember too much...
On 2009-10-26 at 12:10:21, Lee J Haywood wrote...
http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9139716/Engineers_create_material_that_could_hold_1TB_of_data_on_fingernail_sized_chip_
On 2009-11-17 at 11:47:46, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Hmm, it's interesting how unrelated MIPS are compared with GHz - my machine from 2004 is 3.0 GHz (hyperthreaded) and yet it's news that 5 years later they get 7 GHz with liquid helium. Doesn't sound like much of an increase in clock speed. http://gizmodo.com/5404507/amd-phenom-ii-breaks-7ghz-barrier But looking further, where a 3.0 GHz processor from 2003 might have managed about 9,000 MIPS there's one listed for 2009 which manages around 43,000 MIPS. That's a huge increase for the same sort of clock speed, but they cheat somewhat with the multiple cores. Has silicon long since passed its peak limits?
On 2009-11-18 at 02:39:43, BorgClown wrote...
Multicores are proof that silicon chips cannae take it any more, although supercomputers have shown that multicores are the way to go, but only if the software is up to the task, i.e., mostly concurrent.
On 2009-11-18 at 02:40:41, BorgClown wrote...
Higher clock speeds waste energy, several energy efficient cores are better.
On 2009-11-18 at 13:09:45, Lee J Haywood wrote...
What's more impressive is how quickly we've become used to the web, which has only been around commercially for around 14-15 years. http://sixrevisions.com/resources/the-history-of-the-internet-in-a-nutshell/
On 2009-11-18 at 21:31:53, BorgClown wrote...
Or cell phones, or broadband, or LCD screens... I wish the nano and quantum technologies advanced faster, so we could see one more revolution.
On 2009-11-18 at 21:33:16, BorgClown wrote...
Oh, I forgot. Viagra was one of the most significant advances in the last century, it instantaneously improved the lives of millions of people.
On 2009-12-03 at 11:09:12, Lee J Haywood wrote...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8392392.stm
On 2009-12-03 at 21:41:43, BorgClown wrote...
When did TheOnion buy BBC?