OpinionPlenty of organized mental work dulls your artistic side
      – BorgClown, 2009-06-05 at 02:49:47   (12 comments)

On 2009-06-05 at 02:57:55, BorgClown wrote...
I have to agree to this. Since I resumed full-time developing, my writing and vocabulary started to decline. I've noticed how I tend to use plain language instead of elaborate phrases, and crafting a paragraph is more mental effort than last January. It's all about practice, I guess. You fortify your logical half, and your emotional one weakens. Maybe when I become old and retired, the relation can be reversed. It's a sad thing to see nevertheless, kinda like when you get your first job after college and realize you will never practice sports the same way as before, while you start to lose muscle.
On 2009-06-05 at 03:00:01, BorgClown wrote...
I guess that's why many IT nerds play a musical instrument. They might not be awesome, but it helps to keep the right-hemisphere dulling at bay.
On 2009-06-05 at 07:44:37, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Well I certainly cannot play any musical instruments, which is apparently mostly genetic but I think it's down to a complete failure by my music teachers. When I was a teenager I deliberately chose my personality to be more rational and suppress 'moods' that other people suffer from. Eventually I realised that acknowledging your own emotions is important both for empathy and coping with stress. I'd say one of the biggest challenges with trying to be artistic is simply finding the time. You're unlikely to set aside some quiet time for reflection and experimentation if your mind is always active.
On 2009-06-06 at 01:32:59, BorgClown wrote...
Would that be the hidden reason why the lives of genius artists are and have been plagued with self-inflicted disgraces? It's like they tend not to reason too well.
On 2009-06-06 at 08:02:24, Baslisks wrote...
theres a concept called gradual creativity. You don't create a masterpiece in an hour and any thought that you can is completely false. You can luck into one but rarely the process is quick and dry cut.
On 2009-06-06 at 20:31:02, BorgClown wrote...
But what I found is surprising, at least for me: The more I involve with software engineering, the duller I am as a writer. It might be the lack of practice, but I can clearly feel that instead of progressing in my writing skills, they start to gradually deteriorate. A beautifully constructed paragraph (to my taste) is harder to come by than a few months ago. Dry, plain technical writing is as well as ever, tho.
On 2009-06-07 at 16:30:59, Baslisks wrote...
it is the practice thing but its not because you are pushing it out but it is more because you aren't practicing it.
On 2009-06-08 at 23:17:52, Thelevellers wrote...
I think it is all about the amount of practice you give to the creativity - my vocabulary has been vanishing this year as I don't talk enough with smart people with large vocabularys. I spend a lot of time playing guitar, writing music and the like, and enjoy letting my mind wander off into fictional wonderlands lots. I am jobless, so there's certainly no oraganised mental work, possibly too little. I think the issue is more that when you have a lot of work on, it's hard to find time to spend on the creative stuff.
On 2009-06-09 at 01:16:02, BorgClown wrote...
Right. Diversity is key to learning. I haven't had much of it lately. My coworkers are all middle-aged professional and responsible people, I fit nicely but miss the diversity of more disorganized groups. I like my job, so I should find such diversity elsewhere. Food for thought...
On 2009-06-09 at 03:55:26, Baslisks wrote...
Yeah, diversity keeps you on your toes... I need to get into a music scene with a couple people to bounce ideas on.
On 2009-06-09 at 16:24:39, Thelevellers wrote...
Diveristy is about the only reason I'm looking for a house share as opposed to a one bed flat for next year! Otherwise I'd probably only meet engineers, and there's more to life than integrals ;-)
On 2009-06-09 at 17:43:25, Baslisks wrote...
mmm integrals