Web siteNot that I was in any doubt, but waterboarding IS officially torture: http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=448717
      – Thelevellers, 2009-05-20 at 15:19:38   (11 comments)

On 2009-05-20 at 15:21:00, Thelevellers wrote...
OK, maybe 'officially' was the wrong word, but one of the replies does mention that a lawyer voluntarily had it done to him, and came out anti-torture... (surprise, surprise...) Soddin' nut job...
On 2009-05-21 at 04:42:54, BorgClown wrote...
The description he does of the drowning reflex if frightening. I didn't know dying drowned could be so bad.
On 2009-05-21 at 12:48:30, Thelevellers wrote...
I had an inkling, as I grew up on the coast I spent 90% of my summers up until 15 on the North Devon beaches - and they get some of the best surf in the UK (nothing compared to much of the US, but still can be pretty big). I've had my share of pushing my limits and inhaling some water, but only once came close to that level of terror - I got knocked down by a wave when I was 7ish and I hadn't had time to take a breath, and it held me down for what felt like minutes - I freaked quite a bit, but that was actually one of the occaisions I DIDN't inhale water, I just felt my limit of breath holding pass by and was still under water... It's why I've always been shocked at how people could even consider waterboarding 'not so bad', the drowning sensation is horrible, even if you don't get as far as inhaling water...
On 2009-05-21 at 18:35:05, Lee J Haywood wrote...
You do realise that drowning does not require taking water into the lungs? The presence of water in the airways causes severe constriction that means water only gets into the lungs once you've already drowned. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drowning#The_reaction_to_water_inhalation
On 2009-05-22 at 06:12:06, BorgClown wrote...
Hey, now that I remember, as a kid I almost drowned once. At the beach one wave knocked me and made me lose the sense of direction, so I didn't know where to head up. I lost consciousness, but luckily an uncle saw me and rescued me. I regained my sense lying on the beach. It didn't feel bad at all, the most discomforting things was the initial anxiety, and the puking of salt water. I wonder if the experience was so bad as to be repressed. All I know is that I don't fear the sea, even if I still can't swim. I used to fear dying asphyxiated, but being asthmatic made me realize that it was silly to fear one of my probable ways of death. It would just make it more painful. Still, dying asphyxiated or drowned is very different than being tortured without actually dying. The unnatural agony must leave psychological scars.
On 2009-05-27 at 19:00:04, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Do it yourself... http://www.time.com/time/photogallery/0,29307,1901024,00.html
On 2009-05-27 at 22:04:11, Thelevellers wrote...
hardcore...
On 2009-05-27 at 22:28:59, Baslisks wrote...
I thought it might of turned into a candle jack thread.
On 2009-05-28 at 12:35:17, DigitalBoss wrote...
@BorgClown: ask the guy that got all of his fingernails pulled out, if he would rather have a little water poured on his face.
On 2009-05-28 at 21:28:48, Thelevellers wrote...
@DigitalBoss: Ask the guy who did the article I linked which he would prefer, you would evidentally be surprised...
On 2009-05-31 at 15:02:19, BorgClown wrote...
They guy said he would prefer his fingers smashed one by one. But only after he tried the more effective method of waterboarding. It seems the goal of waterboarding is to get a little water in your trachea. It triggers an automatic, non-controllable reflex. It doesn't matter that the water is not reaching the lungs,your body reacts the same. What matters is making you feel the drowning reflex as many times as you need to break. I don't think one can build resistance against that.