OpinionIf interstellar space travel became reality, it would SUCK finding unknown black holes
      – BorgClown, 2009-05-09 at 07:44:21   (14 comments)

On 2009-05-09 at 07:45:35, BorgClown wrote...
It would be like going back to early nautical travel, cruising treacherous seas full of uncharted dangers...
On 2009-05-09 at 08:54:20, Baslisks wrote...
The world would be adventurous!
On 2009-05-09 at 15:54:30, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Correction, you'd get pulled not sucked. What do you have against black holes / dark stars anyway? Surely if you can go and visit them they'd both provide a wealth of information plus some stunning pictures. I guess it's the ones floating around with no accretion discs to spot that would be nasty, unless you can travel via an alternate dimension or wormhole that lets you skip over the intervening space.
On 2009-05-09 at 20:01:42, Thelevellers wrote...
I assumed he meant a 'hidden' one, surprise black holes would be annoying! ;-)
On 2009-05-09 at 23:25:45, BorgClown wrote...
Yes, that's what I meant. Like hiking and stepping on a land mine, it would suck. Although Lee correctly pointed out the failed pun.
On 2009-05-10 at 08:53:31, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Ah, I meant to say gravastar, not dark star. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravastar Being able to visit one would let us know what they actually are. It's depressing to think that we struggle to simply get out of the Earth's gravity well, never mind come up with a method of travel that doesn't rely on simply propulsion.
On 2009-05-10 at 23:03:30, BorgClown wrote...
Astronomical-scale energies are, well, astronomical. Even if some form of antigravity was invented, you would need incredible amounts of energy just to get near big things like stars or black holes. I've always thought that if gravity and radiation weren't a problem, the temperature of outer layer of stars shouldn't be that big of a problem. Our sun is just 5,000 Celsius, less than what many industrial processes reach here.
On 2009-05-11 at 08:18:18, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Have you read Victory Unintentional by Isaac Asimov? It relates to the crushing gravity of Jupiter, but is one of his best short stories.
On 2009-05-12 at 01:42:16, BorgClown wrote...
I'm gonna read it, I'm sure I have it somewhere on my disk.
On 2009-07-16 at 20:43:10, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: http://vivien23.uw.hu/ - page 40 of The Complete Robot.
On 2009-07-17 at 04:11:01, BorgClown wrote...
Oh boy, I had already read it, but in Spanish. I kept thinking why the robots weren't more perceptive about how the Jovians saw them, maybe they weren't as advanced mentally. What stoke me as funny was how the crushing gravity of Jupiter prevented humans from landing, but the Jovian weapons themselves were kinda harmless.
On 2009-10-27 at 14:07:29, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: Oh, I'd missed your comment or not let it sink in. I think that the process was a gradual one, with the robots doing slightly impressive things all the way through and it was the accumulation of these that eventually overwhelmed the Jovians. The robots were a little bit child-like in their exploration, but they were obviously intelligent. And presumably the weapons were harmless because the robots were designed to withstand anything, whereas the weapons were designed for natural beings?
On 2009-10-27 at 21:28:27, BorgClown wrote...
Their awesome weapons? Body-temperature heat, oxygen gassing, and I don't know what else. It was funny because humans could have managed most of it, except for the Jovian environment itself.
On 2009-10-28 at 00:03:12, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: Well the only way it made sense was if the Jovians had never developed robots themselves, in spite of their technology. And presumably they hadn't used spaceships/probes otherwise they'd have studied Earth already. So, being aliens, their technology was different to ours in spite of having recently developed the force field technology required for travel.