SurveyYou have a strong personal reason to effort yourself
      – BorgClown, 2009-02-25 at 04:24:31   (15 comments)

On 2009-02-25 at 04:33:27, BorgClown wrote...
I'm afraid this survey is easy to misunderstand, let me explain: When I was a college student I skipped school several days a week. Managed to get good grades, but didn't effort myself to reach the best grades I was able to. I had a lack of motivation, so I asked several friends of mine what was theirs. Some told me that they wanted to make their parents happy, others took it as a personal challenge, etc. It turns out that I kept my disinterest, since school wasn't my personal challenge, and I didn't feel a strong desire to show my parents higher grades, as most of them were acquired mostly by work instead of learning. I could have been a zen-like underachiever for life, but being married changed my viewpoint. I have a strong desire to care of my wife ans see her happy, and would effort myself in order to do so. The funny thing? I know I could do yet more. LOL, I guess.
On 2009-02-25 at 14:51:57, Lee J Haywood wrote...
My only motivation is to do something I find interesting, and I really struggle when doing something I dislike or have no ability for. At school and university I used knowledge, not work, to get ahead - I never excelled at anything, yet somehow am still considered intelligent and capable. Knowledge lets you do things, and gives you an ability, that comes from having a focused interest. You don't need to just 'work hard' to get ahead, just try to like what you do.
On 2009-02-25 at 17:06:18, Baslisks wrote...
I am not motivated.. That is my biggest problem. Everything just seems like highschool and I hate it. Was told life would be better in college for the most part it is but still dealing with highschool shit.Soooo.. in reality I just hate how things are.
On 2009-02-25 at 18:57:03, Thelevellers wrote...
Lol @basilisks! That is pretty much the reason I ditched uni... I still wanna learn, but I wanna be part of the 'real' world, earning my keep and having an abode I can call mine (until the lease runs out =P). That's a big reason why I am really motivated by the idea of an apprenticeship - I will be working 4 days a week in a job I think I will enjoy, and then one day a week I get paid to go into college and study things related to my job, which in theory I will be interested in. (I already know I wont be interested in all of them, but that's kinda of a bonus, as I wont get the disappointment factor...)
On 2009-02-25 at 18:58:37, Thelevellers wrote...
A major kick up the ass for me last year was not wanting to disappoint my girlfriend, as we had had a talk about things we wanted to achieve, goals we had for life in general a year or two before, and one of mine had been 'get an engineering degree'. It was true at the time, but I didn't really know what I was doing then! It was important for me to show her that I was still going somewhere with my life, and that I still had that goal in mind, even if the specifics had changed. Now I have the very real problem of needing to feed myself atm, and provide for myself in the future to spur me on! The lack of a female distraction helps in a way, though the support would be nice...
On 2009-02-25 at 20:28:54, Baslisks wrote...
I would love an apprenticeship or internship. Learn in a real world environment.
On 2009-02-26 at 04:48:17, BorgClown wrote...
Doing what you like is not a panacea. It is usually coupled with things you don't, like bureaucracy, stupid bosses, or lack of money if you go the lone rider way. I've learned to accept the real world as it is and try to take advantage of it. Sometimes life rocks, and sometimes it sucks. I get the feeling that I'm still learning to live, and I guess that's a lesson who takes a whole life.
On 2009-02-26 at 09:35:11, Lee J Haywood wrote...
But things like bad bosses won't stress you out if you're enjoying your work. If you're not enjoying your work, even the best boss won't be able to help you.
On 2009-02-26 at 17:22:39, Baslisks wrote...
A bad boss would prevent you from doing the work you enjoy. I've had horrible teacher who was teaching an advanced math class. He was teaching to the worst students and not the average. He could of brought the classes over all content to something that was at least high school level rather than grade school. There was plenty room to move down to the lower class and learn there but of course the people were there to get good class lists to get into college.
On 2009-02-26 at 21:23:01, Thelevellers wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Well said, my boss at ASDA was really nice, but the work was bollocks! I've always enjoyed the classes on subjects I like, regardless of the teacher (admittedly, rubbish teachers seem to be drawn to rubbish subjects so far for me! :) Haven't had a job I actually like yet, except for a couple of volunteer days in bike shops, and bike shop owners seem to be cool from those experiences! Which reminds me...
On 2009-02-26 at 23:01:24, Lee J Haywood wrote...
It's very different with education, where the teacher is actually important - I failed English the first time around, but got an A when I retook it. The first teacher focused on the brightest students and decided (incorrectly) that I wasn't in that category... although it was a dumb way to do things anyway, given that the smart students would do well by themselves. But with a bad manager, you can usually just be polite and still get the job done if you love it. Otherwise, good intentions won't help you.
On 2009-02-26 at 23:37:09, Baslisks wrote...
ok makes sense. I need to get out there. Cool boss thing. We have two shop masters. One is a highly technical and awesome at building things while the other can salvage anything. I always love messing up because I learn the "right" way to fix things and the "wrong" way to do it. Real fun.
On 2009-02-28 at 04:03:40, BorgClown wrote...
A bad boss can be awful, at least that's my experience as a developer. If your specs change constantly, it can become frustrating to see your work wasted time after time. No amount of courtesy can alleviate that, it's better to change job (i.e., boss) asap.
On 2009-02-28 at 08:12:44, George wrote...
My motivation to 'effort myself' seems to go up and down a lot in cycles.
On 2009-02-28 at 10:01:46, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: Admittedly if you keep taking off the things you like doing and put onto things you cannot handle then that's a real issue. Boss, n.: an ornamental stud