QuestionIs there any way of contributing small sums to a greater good? In monetary terms that is.
      – Baslisks, 2009-02-22 at 18:21:07   (23 comments)

On 2009-02-22 at 18:23:35, Baslisks wrote...
Now this sounds like a charity thing, in all honesty, a charity could benefit from it but I was thinking more like small writers and cartoonists. I read a lot of webcomics and blogs and they all have amazon wish lists on the side of their page, most of the items they want are pretty small ticket bu they do have larger items. Now I was wondering if there was a way of putting say 5 dollars towards the purchase of some of the larger items along with a group of people, put your name on a card and mail it to the artist. Would be a real cool thing and could result in getting more needed things rather than wanted things.
On 2009-02-22 at 19:17:34, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I don't know what might be available, but it's abysmal that banks still don't provide an electronic currency. All we seem to have is PayPal and a bunch of failing start-ups, which are commercial and nightmarish. An electronic currency is more than about buying stuff from web sites. It's about making use of communication networks to provide an alternative to physical notes and coins, being able to have an electronic wallet that you could theoretically use for anything. The only equivalent I know of is the transport smart cards where the cash is accepted by other retailers, but they're all local and not supported by your own bank. Even in your original question, it's tough to send money internationally other than by signing up to PayPal (which I won't do). I think a lot of potential financing is stunted as a result.
On 2009-02-22 at 19:35:05, Baslisks wrote...
ahhh, yeah... recently read how paypal make their money.... I don't know then. So the goal would be to make a successful local universal currency and then hope to expand it national then global.
On 2009-02-22 at 19:39:06, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I mentioned my idea in http://discussionator.com/?id=147 where I'd do it with just big random numbers (like a one-time pad), possibly with some date/time/value data and a checksum. All it needs is a specification for a protocol, so that you can actually contact a bank's server and claim your money. Of course, they'd overcomplicate it with security and such but it's still a cool idea.
On 2009-02-22 at 20:05:52, Baslisks wrote...
If you controlled it you would be at fault for losing it all.
On 2009-02-22 at 20:58:08, Thelevellers wrote...
I like the idea, basilisks - it's like how my group of friends did a couple of christmasses, instead of everyone getting everyone else crappy £5 presents, we'd all chuck in a contribution, and get everyone one big actually worth while present! (This is how I got a WAH-WAH finally!) I'm haven't read up on Paypal yet, could someone enlighten me?
On 2009-02-22 at 23:45:28, Baslisks wrote...
they charge you for a premium account. This sounds stupid but credit cards are needed for a premium account. Only way to make money on the net.
On 2009-02-25 at 04:50:53, BorgClown wrote...
This topic was exhausted. Money isn't free, it has to be controlled and penalized in order to prevent the "wrong" people from getting financed.
On 2009-02-25 at 04:55:56, BorgClown wrote...
My (awfully made) point is that easy ways to pool small moneys and send them elsewhere, or an actually useful and international electronic currency are not likely to happen soon without the usual inconveniences, like credit accounts.
On 2009-02-25 at 15:04:45, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Credit cards are the biggest scam of all - they don't so much make money from interest payments as from taking a cut of every transaction. Even if you pay without a credit card, if a shop doesn't charge you a different amount then that means they're spreading the charge amongst all their customers - which is normal practice. They make an unbelievable profit from this. With regard to the control of money, it's important to remember that money as we use it is truly a human invention. Instead of being a simple token for objects and services to be repaid, we have interest and - most evil of all - cumulative interest. People save instead of re-investing in their community and yet still struggle for their retirement. I wonder what alternatives might have existed, given the chance?
On 2009-02-25 at 19:02:14, Thelevellers wrote...
I never realised that credit cards incurred a charge for the shop, until a local guitar shop owner pointed it out to me when asking me not to pay with a one, I used cash there from then on! (I'm not fussed about him spreading the cash, he's a legend - indeed a genuine one, the ex-guitarist of Cradle of Filth - and sold everything like strings at at least half the price of any other guitar shop I've seen!) Sorry, topic?! :P
On 2009-02-25 at 20:26:29, Baslisks wrote...
ah, well then I guess I should use cash more.
On 2009-02-26 at 05:33:33, BorgClown wrote...
Money is a good invention, it's an elegant solution to an otherwise complex trade of goods. But it's evil when people make money out of money, or worse yet, out of betting in future predictions. The credit cards are nice examples, making money out of a transaction, even if you don't really need the credit.
On 2009-02-28 at 09:10:58, George wrote...
Since I've been travelling, I've tried to use cash as much as possible, as I find it easier in general, and I'm (maybe slightly) less likely to get ripped off or scammed than with cards. But even at home, in general I use cash rather than cards (in some countries it's crazy how much people use cards - even for a coffee or pack of chewing gum!) as I find it easier to curb my spending that way. I use credit cards when I'm making big purchases (in the UK they offer extra protection in case the company goes bust or the goods don't arrive etc), or when (ahem) I need the credit. But it's not as though the banks don't rip you off when you use cash either. In most countries all ATM transactions attract bank charges. In others, like the UK, the cost of the banks getting cash to you is swallowed up by things like the (lack of) interest that give on your money that they are holding.
On 2009-02-28 at 14:21:44, Thelevellers wrote...
I nearly got burned for not using (having) a credit card yesterday! I was gonna book tickets to a gig on monday, but just before I was gonna do it I got an email from the venue mailing list saying they had had to declare voluntary insolvency! I would have been covered for the tickets if I had used a credit card, I'm lucky I didn't buy 'em really... F*cking NIMBYs - the venue was forced to improve the sound proofing at the end of the summer at great cost, and coupled with the economic problems they couldn't carry on, which is a real shame as that venue was the coolest use of an old church I've been in! Pah.
On 2009-03-01 at 01:35:58, BorgClown wrote...
@Thelevellers: Were they forced to improve the sound proofing because the neighbors complained?
On 2009-03-01 at 12:06:15, Thelevellers wrote...
Yeah. New neighbours as well, so it's not like they didn't know what was next door.... Grrr, was an excellent venue, best in town I'd say...
On 2009-03-01 at 20:34:24, Baslisks wrote...
yeah.... had that happen
On 2009-03-01 at 22:51:24, BorgClown wrote...
Jerk newcomers... Well, in all justice, music (specially practice) is noisy. It was bound to happen sooner or later.
On 2009-03-05 at 21:25:27, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Thinking about it, there are payment systems other than PayPal... there's also Amazon Payments and Google Checkout. With the former, I often buy stuff through Amazon Marketplace that Amazon themselves don't sell. My mother's used Google Checkout and said it was very convenient. Personally, if I want to buy something and it's not available through Amazon (or its marketplace) I either only do so if I'm really desperate or I simply don't bother. The amount of lost transactions due to reliance on PayPal is staggering - why the banks don't get their act together, in either the US or the UK, is beyond me.
On 2009-03-05 at 23:48:06, Baslisks wrote...
You are talking about the intelligence of the us banking system. Do you really have to question it?
On 2009-03-05 at 23:52:02, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I was referring to their greed, not their intelligence. They can use contractors for that.
On 2009-03-06 at 00:16:30, Baslisks wrote...
They figure that the credit companies have it covered.