QuestionIf you really believe you killed someone, is it the same as killing them?
      – Thelevellers, 2009-02-14 at 00:12:37   (5 comments)

On 2009-02-14 at 00:14:49, Thelevellers wrote...
More specifically, say you think they are tied up in the boot of a car, and intentionally drive it off the edge of a cliff, but they weren't (maybe cause of a delusion), should they be classed as mentally unstable enough to warrant sectioning. or imprisonment?
On 2009-02-14 at 00:20:17, Thelevellers wrote...
OK, I was thinking I'd save the details about why I'm thinking about this cause it potentially involves spoilers for a good film, but on further thought I think it's ok, so, unless you intend to wahct 'Lars And The Real Girl' tonight... Specifically that film deals with a guy with a delusion that a sex doll is real, and talks to her and expects everyone around to interact with her as normal - so a full blown delusion. I had a thought at one point: "What are the ramifications if he 'kills' the doll?'. It surely shows he is capable of killing, so isn't that bad enough? Then again of course, it may just be the delusional part of his brain, which could then go into remission, leaving him fine... Just thought you lot might appreciate the thought :)
On 2009-02-14 at 05:06:18, BorgClown wrote...
Interesting thought from a very lousy movie. Kudos for getting something good out of it.
On 2009-02-14 at 21:32:53, Thelevellers wrote...
Lol, I quite enjoyed it myself! But then I was in the mood for a(nother) sex doll movie - as I just said to my house mates: There's nothing funnier than a sex doll, except maybe a jewish one... :)
On 2009-02-15 at 15:46:04, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Try looking at this question from the other side, where you have someone actually kill but their defence is that they were mentally unstable/deluded and weren't aware of their actions. Clearly the law only punishes actual murders that have taken place, not potential ones (and besides, people capable of killing can be of benefit to society). But then it's not too hard to imagine a future where virtual reality is indistinguishable from real reality, and in that case you'd be hard pushed to know if you're in the real world or the virtual one. If you kill someone, with full intent, in the virtual world would you be able to go through with it knowing that you might inadvertently be in the real world? And if you thought that you were killing someone in the real world, with full intent, only to discover that you'd been in the virtual world without realising it... then the real-world police wouldn't care. But you'd probably struggle with the idea that you genuinely thought you'd murdered someone.