SurveyI'd use a teletransporter even if that meant me ceasing to exist and a copy continuing my life unaware of my demise
      – BorgClown, 2008-11-29 at 09:15:10   (17 comments)

On 2008-11-29 at 09:17:36, BorgClown wrote...
Tough choice. If I use the teletransporter and suddenly it's game over for me, my copy can carry on at the destination convinced that transporters are safe, and nobody would be the wiser. Should we give up our uniqueness in favor of the huge benefit of teleportation?
On 2008-11-29 at 10:19:17, Lee J Haywood wrote...
The Star Trek transporters do work in that way - the "discorporation and reconstitution of organic matter" as it says in the comic on the early Trek research into transporters. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Chances_(Star_Trek:_The_Next_Generation) Even if the teleporter sent your actual molecules to the destination, it'd still be the same effect. We're simply machines, but copying us is akin to trying to copy a clock that has mechanical and electrical parts without stopping it first. Except that the mechanical parts are free floating, and there are 10^14 clocks all of which are on the molecular scale. Even a small error in copying would lead to cancer, and multiple copies would lead to rapid degradation. Would it matter if the process were perfected? No, of course not - you'd step off it unaware of any difference and so would everyone else around you. You just wouldn't want to be an early adopter, as with mobile telephones and laser eye surgery.
On 2008-11-30 at 00:44:51, BorgClown wrote...
Wow, maybe the possibility of duplication is a proof that your destination receives a copy, and the original dies.
On 2008-12-01 at 16:32:48, Baslisks wrote...
Could you have it that the copy and the original survive? Easy cloning.
On 2008-12-01 at 17:05:52, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Hmm, it's surprising that they didn't use deliberate cloning as a storyline (in Star Trek)... perhaps the idea was that the original was actually taken apart to examine it, and only a crazy phenomenon would cause duplication. More likely there are simply laws against making copies, as it would lead to obvious problems establishing someone's identity. There were episodes where actual cloning was covered, and they're social commentaries designed to mirror issues we have in our time - cloning of humans being considered abhorrent no matter how advanced the technology.
On 2008-12-02 at 05:33:35, Baslisks wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: mmmm, have you by chance played eve?
On 2008-12-02 at 09:23:40, Lee J Haywood wrote...
No, I never progressed beyond Nanvaent.
On 2008-12-02 at 17:42:42, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Nice, I've never realized that cloning was taboo in Star Trek. If Dr. Soong made clones of himself rather than androids, it would be like if he was having sons with his sister.
On 2008-12-04 at 00:59:00, Thewrit wrote...
of course not... i don't want to die.
On 2008-12-04 at 02:47:29, BorgClown wrote...
But your copy would be you, in a sense. He would never recall having died, because he never did. For practical terms there wouldn't be any difference.
On 2008-12-04 at 23:39:19, Thewrit wrote...
except one should die... you using this, knowing that will happen, is any different from taking a gun and blow your own head?
On 2008-12-04 at 23:59:44, BorgClown wrote...
The interesting part is how to know it. We could study its working and theorize about it, but only stepping in would tell if you die. But then it'd have to kill you =(
On 2008-12-17 at 16:41:04, Scarletxstarlet wrote...
I agree that I would do this because I already have, in a way. We all have memories of childhood, but the atoms in our body are completely different than the ones that we had at that time. Physically, that child has died. Which begs the question: What makes us unique people in the first place? Where does this "me" come from if I am just a conglomerate of fluidly changing matter?
On 2008-12-17 at 18:57:01, BorgClown wrote...
I've always found interesting that if out atoms are completely replaced every few decades, then how come our scars and tattoos don't vanish?
On 2008-12-17 at 19:08:30, BorgClown wrote...
Searching for more data, I found that some organs hardly or never get replacement cells, like corneas, teeth or the brain. It's a nice topic to look up further.
On 2008-12-17 at 19:31:37, Lee J Haywood wrote...
New Scientist had a complete article on the subject several years ago, but I cannot tell if it's in the archive or not.
On 2008-12-18 at 06:24:52, BorgClown wrote...
I searched and saw lots of discussion about the subject, I lost the will to weed out the hundreds of similar links. It appears that only some of your cells are completely renewed, the stomach lining being the most extreme case: five days on average