OpinionOur urban society promotes isolationism, which increases the proportion of mental disorders
      – BorgClown, 2008-11-08 at 23:55:38   (11 comments)

On 2008-11-09 at 00:02:47, BorgClown wrote...
I went to buy grilled meat today. The clerk is always polite, but as soon as we finished the transaction (and as I waited for the meat to be ready), our interaction was done. She proceeded to attend other customers and paperwork, and I went to a chair and started playing FreeCell in my cell phone. That made me realize that she's the thing that takes my money and gives me yummy food, and I'm one of the things that consume and keep her workplace alive. Maybe I should know her name, make a little chit-chat if appropriate and break that anonymity shield all city-dwellers seem to have... OTOH, I want people to leave me alone, I have no obligation to be someone's diversion if they're bored. What a conundrum, maybe we (or our descendants) will adapt to it...
On 2008-11-09 at 08:49:39, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I often make the effort to talk to such people, especially when I see them over and over. Generally it doesn't help when they're surrounded by their work colleagues, making customer conversation more unlikely, and the transactions are usually done too quickly to allow you to get anywhere. Even when you meet people at regular social gatherings, it takes a while to realise just how long it takes to make an actual friend. Simply having a conversation with someone once a week (or perhaps once a day in the workplace) isn't a friendship at all - that requires a genuine interest in each other that makes you want to provide mutual support.
On 2008-11-10 at 03:06:14, BorgClown wrote...
I'd like to upgrade those people from things to actual human beings, with families and such. Not necessarily be friends, just see them as people. OTOH, I don't want it a lot, because I would have done it already if I really did.
On 2008-11-10 at 08:48:40, Lee J Haywood wrote...
You'd only be likely to find out more information about them by stalking. It's enough to smile and be polite to someone you see regularly, acknowledging that you recognise them and appreciate their service - making their day slightly better.
On 2008-11-12 at 07:43:22, Despicable wrote...
Rural areas, small towns and country folks isolate themselves from that which is different from what they are. The idiocy of rural life exists because of their limited contacts with a broad spectrum of people from different walks of life. This prejudice of that which is different causes isolation and contempt of others and false pride in themselves.
On 2008-11-12 at 08:08:11, Despicable wrote...
@BorgClown: Close relationships is not what it is cracked up to be. "Familiarity breeds contempt." To my way of thinking the ideal relationship is that which is not too close but close enough to appreciate the relationship but not so close that the relationship is smothered.
On 2008-11-12 at 09:35:08, Despicable wrote...
Our urban society gives us the potential of integrating our individual identity into a diverse culture on the basis of equality. This marriage of cultures is adding cultural attributes to the relationship. This is much better than assimilating on the basis of surrendering your culture to a dominant culture because nothing is added to the relationship by sublimating your identity and taking on the identity of your master.
On 2008-11-12 at 16:57:20, BorgClown wrote...
I never thought of it that way, Despicable. Indeed, rural people heavily discriminate anything different. My grandpa was a farmer, and he had some jokes on him because he was the first one in his town to rotate crops and introduce machinery. And later the jokes became resentment when his fields had better yield than the others. Eventually almost all farmers followed him, but only for the increased crops.
On 2008-11-19 at 08:23:15, Despicable wrote...
When cowboys spend their days on a horse looking at the rear end of cows you cannot expect them to know too much of anything outside of a cows ass.
On 2008-11-19 at 08:30:27, Despicable wrote...
When cowboys spend most of their days on a horse watching the rear end of a cow you cannot expect them to know much about anything except about a cow's ass.
On 2008-11-19 at 15:18:19, Baslisks wrote...
@Despicable: nicely said. I live on a college campus in the middle of St. Louis. It's gotten so cliquey that it is almost painful. I tried to strike a conversation up with a couple of people the other day... was pulling teeth. Basically stopped trying.