OpinionSmokers are dying out.
      – Lee J Haywood, 2008-10-15 at 09:52:23   (29 comments)

On 2008-10-15 at 10:16:01, Lee J Haywood wrote...
It seems that there will always be a group of smokers gathered together outside, in countries where smoking is banned inside public buildings, yet they're facing ever-increasing pressure to give up and opposition to advertising is bound to increase.
On 2008-10-15 at 17:14:16, BorgClown wrote...
I wonder if becoming a rare activity will make smoking "cool" again.
On 2008-11-05 at 04:26:44, Nevermore wrote...
I'm not convinced. I know a LOT of smokers.
On 2009-01-12 at 11:06:21, Lee J Haywood wrote...
http://listverse.com/science/30-fascinating-cigarette-smoking-facts/
On 2009-01-12 at 20:06:40, Thelevellers wrote...
Those really are interesting facts! This one leapt out at me: 24. Some people (mostly males) can be aroused by the sight of smoker smoking (usually females). I have to confess to being the polar opposite - there a few bigger turn offs for me than a woman smoking... My ex's attitude towards it infuriated me, but I have morals that say you can't force someone to change for you. Pah! :P I hope smokers are dying out, it's a nasty habit that has caused me a surprising amount of grief, especially considering I don't know any lung cancer victims. I always hated being around my mum smoking, and I lost out on making friends at one school cause all the interesting people smoked and I didn't wanna hang around the dingy smoking area inhaling their second hand smoke.
On 2009-01-12 at 20:12:08, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I went into a pub on Friday where they hadn't bothered to refurbished since the smoking ban - it was particularly disgusting. I've discovered the main place to be exposed to smokers is now right in front of the hospital entrance - which seems somewhat ironic. Smoking is also my number one turn-off - even if I was initially interested in a woman, discovering that she's a smoker automatically places her in the category of most-unattractive women. For me, seeing the blackened lungs in biology class at school was enough to ensure that I'd never, ever try smoking. It seems that some people simply don't care about their bodies, which seems quite sad to me.
On 2009-01-12 at 20:16:36, Thelevellers wrote...
I have to say, now I'm apart from my ex, I hear she is smoking as much/more as before, and it is factoring in as an(other) reason not to want her back! It's strange witnessing the effect on me as I look at a hot woman and think 'hello!', and that change almost instantly to 'F off!' as she lights up... Lol! Encountering smokers outside in bunches is really irritating! It's almost bad enough on some nights in Cardiff that I want the ban repealed :S
On 2009-01-12 at 20:19:25, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Hopefully the wind, rain and cold will teach them a lesson. I have a similar issue with the sort of people who sport tattoos (although they are easily covered up) and particularly piercings. People who stick metal in their faces are just bizarre.
On 2009-01-12 at 20:30:47, Mudjun wrote...
I couldn't help it! I was little and they gave me irresponsible amounts of candy to rot my under-calcified teeth and forced dental amalgams on me! .. But you're totally right about the smokers. Let em rot in their gloomy frozen smokers' gulag.
On 2009-01-12 at 20:41:04, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I said faces to distinguish from ears, but your mouth isn't your face. (-: Having said that, I don't much like tongue piercings either.
On 2009-01-12 at 21:55:56, Baslisks wrote...
this goes with the whole social taboo thing. These are decisions people make to express and determine how they live. If left up to the individual anything can happen but normally society intervenes and pushes and coaxes our decisions to a set standards. You are also pushing your standards on other people. If you are in power and majority then by all means push your power but don't damn them to hell. I wish the government wouldn't of stepped in an imposed a smoking ban. In truth, I believe it was up to the owners of the establishments to choose whether or not people should smoke. The area is nicer but that just sets up a precedent for them to maybe choose that you can't eat cheesecake on the account it might cause a heart attack down the road, because you know each cheese cake takes 4 minutes off your life. Life is meant for living, dying is a part of living.
On 2009-01-12 at 21:58:10, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Except that eating a cheesecake doesn't fill the lungs of everyone around you with smoke. Although it might make you fat...
On 2009-01-13 at 03:55:17, Baslisks wrote...
Again, its a choice. You have a choice to move, ask them to move, or just live with it. Castrating choice isn't the best choice.
On 2009-01-13 at 03:55:31, Baslisks wrote...
wow that was a bad ending....
On 2009-01-13 at 10:04:24, Lee J Haywood wrote...
And how many pubs were smoke-free before the ban? The smoke was entirely pervasive, and even if no-one was smoking at any given moment there would still be the stench in the air, the walls and the seats. The difference to non-smokers is nothing short of amazing now that the ban is in place, and I for one have switched from avoidance to attendance in the last year. I did read recently that fewer people visit pubs now, but that's not entirely surprising and I think that in the long run things must improve because non-smokers will start getting out more and smokers will either give up, die out or live with it.
On 2009-01-13 at 18:16:20, Thelevellers wrote...
I agree a little with your sentiment baslisks, on the whole I do think that the government control of such things should be reduced, but in this case I have to say I'm being a bit of a hypocrite...
On 2009-01-13 at 18:19:12, Baslisks wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: So you are subjecting them to very fate that you had. Put up with it or just leave?
On 2009-01-13 at 18:29:11, Thelevellers wrote...
Ah, but I think the crucial difference is that the smokers aren't having to put up with a (potentially) life shortening circumstance - they are being forced to put up with healthy surroundings, just terrible... ;)
On 2009-01-13 at 20:01:23, Baslisks wrote...
@Thelevellers: Enjoy yourself. Its later than you think. Risk vs Reward.
On 2009-01-13 at 23:40:27, Lee J Haywood wrote...
There's no reward from smoking, other than in the mind of a smoker. Pretty much any non-smoker will agree that smoking is disgusting, and cigarette smoke doubly so.
On 2009-01-14 at 20:43:59, Thelevellers wrote...
What he said ;)
On 2009-01-23 at 14:49:12, Lee J Haywood wrote...
http://www.phombo.com/anime-cartoons-comics/calvin-and-hobbes/9392/full/popular/
On 2009-01-23 at 15:15:49, Baslisks wrote...
this is the post I wanted it in. bhutan... banned.
On 2009-01-23 at 18:14:12, Thelevellers wrote...
Wow. A whole country completely banning smoking, that's impressive! Not sure I agree though... Meh - politics is hard :(
On 2009-01-23 at 19:06:07, Baslisks wrote...
@Thelevellers: think of all the taxes lost.
On 2009-01-23 at 21:40:39, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I did think about posting this earlier, but hadn't realised it was current news until you said... http://slate.msn.com/id/2112449/ One would assume that the gains in health would more than outweigh those from taxes, particularly in freeing up medical staff to work on people more deserving of their time.
On 2009-01-25 at 04:02:42, BorgClown wrote...
Do smokers actually cost that much to the state? Smokers don't leech the health system until they get cancer or emphysema, and then they don't last very long. Unless of course, they have their annual checkup religiously, and consequently get early treatment while keeping the habit.
On 2009-01-25 at 09:55:37, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Well it's a bit different with a tax-based health service, where they are taking up valuable beds and staff time. Wikipedia gives a lot of information about health effects, and second-hand smoking causes deaths - not just ill health. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_effects_of_tobacco It's also interesting that smoking is a big enough public health problem in developing countries that eliminating it in developed countries would set a positive message for other nations. It's tough to claim that personal choice is being infringed upon when talking about an addictive drug which is often taken at a young age.
On 2009-01-26 at 01:36:50, BorgClown wrote...
Oh,right, I forgot about the passive smokers.