OpinionI am boycotting DRM-infested media. Companies need to stop treating paying customers like criminals.
      – Beeba, 2008-09-09 at 22:04:56   (38 comments)

On 2008-09-09 at 22:06:44, BorgClown wrote...
I give this topic five stars. DRM annoys paying customers more than pirates. It's useless.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:07:45, Beeba wrote...
the spore thread brought this up for me. if you purchase spore you only get to reinstall the game you paid for twice, after which you are no longer allowed to play your own game you paid $50 for. the crazy thing is this does NOTHING to stop piracy, absolutely fucking nothing. the ONLY thing DRM does is punish paying customers and greatly reduce the quality of the legal, retail product. pirates still pirate the media, and they easily remove the DRM, so in fact if you pirate a copy you will get a better quality product. if anything DRM encourages piracy.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:10:51, Lee J Haywood wrote...
It's been a similar situation with music CDs. I bought one from Amazon, only to discover that it was a 'product' - the word 'CD' didn't appear anywhere on it because Philips insist that CDs are interoperable, and 'copy-protected' CDs aren't. The only 'protection' was to prevent it playing in the CD player in my PC at work, which is what I'd bought it for - so I sent it back (to at least get it to register as a return). I haven't bought more than a couple of music CDs since, several years later - I used to buy them all the time.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:14:41, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: You should have copied it before returning it. I loathe DRM too, had my share of experiences at first with the iPods.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:14:53, Thewrit wrote...
god bless emule and torrent.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:17:21, Beeba wrote...
at least there is a simple solution. if it has DRM, pirate it instead.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:17:46, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@BorgClown: The funny thing was that I already had a copy of the album as MP3s, but bought it both to have an original and to be able to play it in the CD player at work - more conveniently and without any legal issues. Adding the DRM was foolish, because I ended up just sticking with the copy.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:19:03, Lee J Haywood wrote...
It's the same with those unskippable copyright messages on DVDs... If you get a copy then you don't get the messages, but if you actually pay for it you have huge inconvenience forced upon you.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:21:48, Thewrit wrote...
i dont buy stuff because i can afford. and when ill be able to i wont.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:21:55, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Some protection is okay, like CSS and AACS - but it has to be invisible, i.e. not break anything. It's hard to believe that Sony would install rootkits to prevent copying, but the did - not as invisible as they'd hoped.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:22:02, Thewrit wrote...
* i dont buy stuff because i cant afford. and when ill be able to i wont.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:22:13, Beeba wrote...
so if you PAY for a product, you get something which is restricted, forces you to watch stupid messages and even "self-destructs" if you attempt to use it too many times or fail to re-authenticate. if you PIRATE the same product, you get a completely unrestricted version which you are free to keep forever and use as you please, you probably can get it earlier (since most media seems to get leaked before the release date these days) and of course it's free. tough decision.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:23:32, Beeba wrote...
i think a company could actually make huge sales if they made the decision to trust the consumers and put no restrictions whatsoever on their product. i would totally pay for something like that.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:23:55, Thewrit wrote...
if all internet users knew how to get softwares and music by torrent...
On 2008-09-09 at 22:24:55, Lee J Haywood wrote...
@Beeba: Like Magnatune, you mean? (-:
On 2008-09-09 at 22:25:20, Thewrit wrote...
@Beeba: only if it wont be so priced. i wont pay $25 on a cd when a blank one costs $.75.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:25:32, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Forced DVD copyright messages are my greatest annoyance. The people who copies the discs won't obey them anyway.
On 2008-09-09 at 22:27:39, BorgClown wrote...
@Lee J Haywood: Magnatune is a great concept, although I rarely copy or buy music. If there was something similar for TV or movies, I'll gladly pay for it.
On 2008-09-09 at 23:20:24, Baslisks wrote...
spore pissed me off.
On 2008-09-09 at 23:21:42, Korinthian wrote...
@Baslisks: How so?
On 2008-09-09 at 23:22:12, Korinthian wrote...
Oh, because of the 3-times-only install?
On 2008-09-09 at 23:26:51, Baslisks wrote...
yeah, not getting it till they take that off. I really want it.
On 2008-09-09 at 23:31:20, Korinthian wrote...
5 star: 2% (46) 4 star: 1% (32) 3 star: 0% (17) 2 star: 2% (42) 1 star: 92% (1,690)
On 2008-09-09 at 23:31:42, Korinthian wrote...
That's Spore on amazon.com. Guess what everyone is complaining about?
On 2008-09-09 at 23:31:44, Baslisks wrote...
those 1 stars are for drm.
On 2008-09-09 at 23:38:48, BorgClown wrote...
Very harsh reviews, love them.
On 2008-09-10 at 17:12:10, Matzevolt wrote...
Don't download this song... Even Lars Ulrich knows it's wrong (you can just ask him!) But seriously, I avoid that kind of media too. There are 3 ways I get new media: buying, renting and downloading. Normally I download a new album for instance "the old fashioned way", listen to it and if I like it, I buy it via Amazon.de. I watched "The Dark Knight" at home, fuckin' loved it and bought a ticket for 12 Bucks to see it. That's the way it should be. Only pay if it's quality.
On 2009-04-08 at 11:55:13, Lee J Haywood wrote...
http://www.escapistmagazine.com/articles/view/columns/experienced-points/5930-The-Impossible-DRM.2
On 2009-04-08 at 15:06:01, Baslisks wrote...
not a bad article.
On 2009-04-08 at 18:10:59, Lee J Haywood wrote...
Here's another interesting take on copyright in general (although it's rather long-winded, so just skim the interesting bits). http://monolith.sourceforge.net/
On 2009-04-09 at 03:43:02, BorgClown wrote...
Very interesting read, it's good to know that something like Monolith is around, you never know...
On 2009-04-09 at 03:51:32, BorgClown wrote...
LOL, XOR munging. It's amazing such a simple binary operator can be so useful.
On 2009-04-09 at 08:20:08, Lee J Haywood wrote...
I use XOR for (part of) my encryption, where a piece of information combined with a random number using XOR becomes another random number. There's no way to get back to either original number without knowing the other. Indeed, that's all Monolith is - a way of encrypting the data. Their take on how copyright works is a good read, but the law doesn't care if you've encrypted the data so long as it can show that the original can be recovered with a key (no matter how complex that key may be). In the (near?) future I'd expect encryption to be used much more heavily on peer-to-peer networks, as it gives a slight ability to say that nothing copyrighted was being transferred (when it is).
On 2009-04-10 at 03:44:49, BorgClown wrote...
The key, no pun intended, is that the retrieval of the copyrighted material is done in your home, after the munged data was transferred. Good read indeed, I'd love to see the EFF opinion of it.
On 2009-04-10 at 09:09:42, Lee J Haywood wrote...
The article makes out that there are an infinite number of ways to encode the copyrighted material, but in reality a particular (encrypted) download is decoded in exactly one way - it only has one key, and if you know the key then the chances are that the people coming after you will have it too. Again, the law doesn't distinguish between different ways to encode/store something, only the fact that copyrighted material is identifiable with whatever transformation is necessary.
On 2009-04-13 at 19:15:25, Thelevellers wrote...
I was burned by DRM once - I bought the first and only mp3 album - actually it was an EP, but near enough - and was at the time running linux exclusively, once downloaded I realised that the easiest way to be able to listen to my legitimate copy of this EP was to copy the files to my then g/fs laptop (so glad she was visiting!) and break the law by burning/ripping them. As someone who makes a point of buying CDs cause they are cool, and to support the artists (I also go to A LOT of live gigs when I have the money, maybe 40 (big-ish) in the last year or so?) this pissed me off no end. Especially when I later discovered the EP was available on CD after all (damn you amazon!).
On 2009-04-13 at 19:18:31, Thelevellers wrote...
ooh, just remembered Offspring make me happy on this subject - they released their Hammerhead single last summer for free on their website, and specified that it was DRM free. They also tried to award a the first fan to download their Conspiracy of One album (back in 2000ish) for free from their website one million dollars, but their record label put a stop to that. It's nice to see bands that are sensible about such thing, the former drummer for Nine Inch Nails did something cool recently too - http://mashable.com/2009/02/20/josh-freese-album-promotion/ Even though I'm not currently a fan of him or NIN (never listened) I am tempted, as I'm a sucker for limited editions... hmm, I'll stop now before I drop off the cliff and we never make it back on track! ;-)
On 2009-04-13 at 20:42:56, Lee J Haywood wrote...
The only good Nine Inch Nails album was their first one. I have a lot of them after that, and they're all just noise.